Work With Us is a catalyst for change aimed at increasing awareness and understanding of the impact of mental and physical health in Canada’s workforce.

Our jobs and our livelihood depend on the strength of our people. This program aims to provide the tools to those with depression and/or arthritis that will help them effectively self-manage, lead healthier lives and fully engage in work. It also offers support for the development of stronger workplace policies and practices.

Mood Disorders Society of Canada and The Arthritis Society recognize that approximately 7.1 million Canadians now live with arthritis and depression, while both of these conditions frequently strike people during their peak earning years. Based on this understanding, we are committed to providing the support in workplaces across Canada.

What We Know

The Arthritis Society and Mood Disorders Society of Canada recognize that approximately 7.1 million Canadians now live with arthritis and depression, and both of these conditions frequently strike people during their peak earning years.

Mood Disorders Society of Canada reports that 56% of employers consider ongoing increases to employee’s mental health claims to be a top concern. In their report, ‘Making the Case for Investing in Mental Health in Canada,’ the Mental Health Commission of Canada found that in 2011 alone, mental health problems and illnesses accounted for more than $6 billion in direct business losses due to lost productivity from absenteeism, presenteeism and turnover.

In their report Arthritis in Canada, The Arthritis Community Research and Evaluation Unit found that, “people with arthritis are more likely to report reduction of activities at work or not being in the labour force than those without arthritis.” The Arthritis Society and The Arthritis Alliance also state in their fact sheet, Arthritis in Canada: Facts & Figures, that the impact of arthritis on the Canadian economy in healthcare costs and lost productivity is estimated at $33 billion each year. The Arthritis Alliance also estimates that wage-based productivity costs associated with conditions like rheumatoid arthritis could be as high as $45.1 billion by 2020.